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Copenhagen, Matthias Godicchen for Peter Haubold, 1666.

8vo., ff. [6], pp. 150, + single leaf, Typographus lectori; an excellent copy in old vellum-backed boards.

£1600

Approximately:
US $2094€1897

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First edition of the first Danish national bibliography, edited posthumously by the author’s famous brother, Thomas Bartholin. The book is a remarkable record of Danish literature from its early days to the middle of the 17th century. The Bartholins list over 500 authors and more than 1000 different titles.

The Bartholins, known primarily for their contributions to anatomy, include Kaspar senior, his sons Thomas and Albert, and Thomas’ own son, Kaspar. The most famous of these is Thomas, who is known as the one who discovered the lymphatic system. Thomas was also a literary scholar. When his younger brother Albert died at forty-three before finishing his bibliography of Danish writers, Thomas took over the project and supervised publication.

This is a presentation copy from Thomas Bartholin, with inscription on title (cut into at outer edge) reading ‘Ludovici B[…]. Dono D[edit]. T Barth. 1666’. Booklabel of Bent Juel-Jensen.

Breslauer and Folter, no.64

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