BARTHOLIN ON UNICORNS

De unicornu observationes novae. Secunda editione auctiores & emendatiores editae.

Amsterdam, Henricus Wetstein, 1678.

12mo, pp. [16], 381, [15]; large folding plate, engraved title by R. de Hooghe, and 23 copper-engraved illustrations in text; woodcut device to title, text in Roman with passages of Greek; a very good copy in contemporary French calf, spine gilt in compartments, lettered directly in one, board-edges roll-tooled in gilt, edges speckled red, sewn two-up and bypass on 4 cords; lightly rubbed and a little bumped at corners, end-caps chipped with short splits to joints; upper board lettered ‘Mr le Petit’ in gilt, manuscript notes to endpapers, armorial embossed bookplate on red paper to upper pastedown.

£1500

Approximately:
US $2077€1729

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De unicornu observationes novae. Secunda editione auctiores & emendatiores editae.

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First illustrated edition (second overall) of Bartholin’s scarce treatise. The second of his family in a distinguished line of physicians at the University of Copenhagen, Thomas Bartholin (1616 - 1680) is remembered more for his medical discoveries than for the present work discussing single-horned beasts of all varieties. The text and illustrations include creatures ranging from the rhinoceros and narwhal to the basilisk and Margaretha Mainers of North Holland, reported to have grown a horn in her old age.

First published in Padua in 1645, the present edition was revised by Bartholin’s son, Caspar Bartholin the younger, and printed with an allegorical engraved title by Romeyn de Hooghe (1645 – 1708) and numerous illustrations.

STCN 842258639.

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