Pharmacopoeia hippiatrica, or the Gentleman Farrier’s Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses in two Books, containing I. the surgical, II. the medical Part of practical Farriery, with suitable Remarks on the Whole.

Eton, J. Pote for T. Pote, 1764.

8vo, pp. xii, 382, [1], [1 (blank)]; title minimally foxed; a very good copy in contemporary English speckled sheep, borders double-filleted in gilt, spine gilt-ruled in compartments with gilt red morocco lettering-piece in one, endbands sewn on reed cores, sewn two-up and bypass on 5 cords, in a recent brown cloth clamshell box with silver-gilt label to spine; a little rubbed, end-caps and tail-band lost, joints subtly reinforced with tissue; eighteenth-century armorial bookplate of William Constable to upper pastedown, twentieth-century bookseller’s label of C.E. Rappaport, Rome.

£850

Approximately:
US $1053€947

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Pharmacopoeia hippiatrica, or the Gentleman Farrier’s Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses in two Books, containing I. the surgical, II. the medical Part of practical Farriery, with suitable Remarks on the Whole.

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First edition, published at Eton. A surgeon rather than a farrier, John Bartlet (c. 1716-1772) intended his work as a successor to and revision of Gibson’s: ‘Mr. Gibson’s dispensatory published thirty years ago, is too prolix, and not managed with due accuracy and precision. Virtues are there ascribed to medicines, which have no foundation in fact, and foreign matter is so interwoven, as if the book was intended, to be recommended by its bulk.’ The work is of particular interest for its inventory of recommended equipment for ‘The Gentleman Farrier’s Elaboratory’ and for its glossary of terms used in mid-eighteenth-century farriery.

The son of a bookseller at Eton College, the author had his work published by his brother-in-law, Joseph Pote, who had taken over Bartlet’s father’s business around 1729. Though less printed than his Gentleman’s Farriery, the Repository was well received, reaching its third edition in 1773 with three pirated Dublin versions and an American edition following in 1775.

ESTC T88024; Dingley 39; not in Mellon.

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