Pharmacopoeia hippiatrica, or the Gentleman Farrier’s Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses in two Books, containing I. the surgical, II. the medical Part of practical Farriery, with suitable Remarks on the Whole.

Eton, J. Pote for T. Pote, 1764.

8vo, pp. xii, 382, [1], [1 (blank)]; title minimally foxed; a very good copy in contemporary English speckled sheep, borders double-filleted in gilt, spine gilt-ruled in compartments with gilt red morocco lettering-piece in one, endbands sewn on reed cores, sewn two-up and bypass on 5 cords, in a recent brown cloth clamshell box with silver-gilt label to spine; a little rubbed, end-caps and tail-band lost, joints subtly reinforced with tissue; eighteenth-century armorial bookplate of William Constable to upper pastedown, twentieth-century bookseller’s label of C.E. Rappaport, Rome.

£850

Approximately:
US $1160€954

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Pharmacopoeia hippiatrica, or the Gentleman Farrier’s Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses in two Books, containing I. the surgical, II. the medical Part of practical Farriery, with suitable Remarks on the Whole.

Checkout now

First edition, published at Eton. A surgeon rather than a farrier, John Bartlet (c. 1716-1772) intended his work as a successor to and revision of Gibson’s: ‘Mr. Gibson’s dispensatory published thirty years ago, is too prolix, and not managed with due accuracy and precision. Virtues are there ascribed to medicines, which have no foundation in fact, and foreign matter is so interwoven, as if the book was intended, to be recommended by its bulk.’ The work is of particular interest for its inventory of recommended equipment for ‘The Gentleman Farrier’s Elaboratory’ and for its glossary of terms used in mid-eighteenth-century farriery.

The son of a bookseller at Eton College, the author had his work published by his brother-in-law, Joseph Pote, who had taken over Bartlet’s father’s business around 1729. Though less printed than his Gentleman’s Farriery, the Repository was well received, reaching its third edition in 1773 with three pirated Dublin versions and an American edition following in 1775.

ESTC T88024; Dingley 39; not in Mellon.

You may also be interested in...

WITH OCCULT ANNOTATIONS HILL, John.

The useful Family Herbal, or an Account of all those English Plants, which are remarkable for their Virtues, and of the Drugs, which are produced by Vegetables of other Countries, with their Descriptions, and their Uses, as proved by Experience, illustrated with Figures of the most useful English Plants, with an Introduction … and an Appendix, containing a Proposal for the farther Seeking into the Virtues of English Herbs, and the Manner of Doing it with Ease and Safety … the second Edition.

Second edition, published the year after the first, with contemporary annotations. Apothecary, actor, and prolific writer, John Hill (1714 – 1775) published his Useful Family Herbal in 1754, an otherwise ‘unaccountably unproductive year’ (ODNB). Through a long and varied career he wrote widely on botany and its uses, including the first Linnaean flora of Britain, his Flora Britanica [sic] of 1759.

Read more

FIRST HISTORY OF VETERINARY LITERATURE BLAINE, Delabere Pritchett.

The Outlines of the veterinary Art, or the Principles of Medicine as applied to a Knowledge of the Structure, Functions, and Oeconomy of the Horse, the Ox, the Sheep, and the Dog, and to a more scientific and successful Manner of Treating their various Diseases, the whole illustrated by anatomical Plates.

Very rare first edition, with contemporary manuscript notes. Blaine’s most comprehensive work, The Outlines of the veterinary Art is written in three parts, discussing the history of veterinary science, anatomy, and the practice of veterinary medicine. ‘The earliest record in the English language of the origin and growth of veterinary literature’, Blaine’s history ‘is not without error, but nevertheless presents a very good account of the subject’ (Smith).

Read more