The Gentleman Farrier’s Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses in two Books, containing I. the surgical, II. the medical Part of practical Farriery, also Directions for the proper Treatment of Post Chaise and other Horses after violent Exercise, with suitable Remarks on the whole, to which are now added Observations on broken-winded Horses, endeavouring to prove the Seat of that Malady not to be in the Lungs … the third Edition.

Philadelphia, Joseph Crukshank, 1775.

12mo in 6s, pp. xii, 293, [3]; light foxing in places; a good copy in contemporary ?American mottled sheep, spine lettered ‘B’ directly in blind, sewn two-up on 5 cords; rubbed, worn at corners with worming; blind stamp of Joseph A. Sadony to title.

£850

Approximately:
US $1160€954

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The Gentleman Farrier’s Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses in two Books, containing I. the surgical, II. the medical Part of practical Farriery, also Directions for the proper Treatment of Post Chaise and other Horses after violent Exercise, with suitable Remarks on the whole, to which are now added Observations on broken-winded Horses, endeavouring to prove the Seat of that Malady not to be in the Lungs … the third Edition.

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Rare first American edition of Bartlet’s Pharmacopœia hippiatrica. Printed in Philadelphia in the first year of the Revolutionary War, this edition retains Bartlet’s dedication to the Duke of Cumberland, brother of George III.

ESTC records ten copies in the US and none in the UK. We could only trace one copy at auction in the past century (Parke Bernet, library of William Mitchell van Winkle, 1940).

ESTC W12341; not in Dingley; not in Mellon.

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