The Rector of Oxbury. A Novel ...

London: Samuel Tinsley ... 1877.

3 vols., 8vo., volume II lacks the advertisements and catalogue described by Wolff; original lilac blue cloth, a bit soiled, covers decorated in blind, gilt-lettered spines, front hinge of volume I cracked, but a good copy.


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First edition. The Anglican rector of Oxbury innocently befriends the new minister of the local non-conformist chapel, who soon finds that any association with the established church arouses the distrust of his own congregation. Marriage to an Anglican girl makes matters worse, and several of his parishoners plot to bring about his downfall. Wolff 352 (in red-brown cloth). Rare; not in NUC and Supplement; Texas only on OCLC.

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