The Naiveté of Verdi.

[New York, The Hudson Review, 1968].

Offprint, pp. 12; loose leaves, wire-stitched; first leaf reversed; with the author’s signed autograph presentation inscription “but soon a book for yourself: I hope it will be worthy. Isaiah.”, Library stamp on title-page.

£750

Approximately:
US $922€874

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The Naiveté of Verdi.

Checkout now

First edition. Presentations by Berlin are rare, and this one is presumed to be for one of his closest friends, Stephen Spender. Spender had dedicated his World within World (1951) to Berlin, and this inscription most probably refers to Berlin’s forthcoming Four Essays on Liberty (1969) dedicated to Spender.

The Naiveté of Verdi is Berlin’s attempt to apply Schiller’s distinction between ‘naiv’ and ‘sentimentalisch’ poets to music. He characterises Verdi as ‘the last naive artist of genius’, and contrasts him directly with composers such as Liszt and Wagner, who were ‘protagonists of all that was most self-conscious, extra-musical, “sentimental”’.

You may also be interested in...

INSCRIBED ‘MY BEST COPY’ LEWIS, Wyndham.

The Demon of Progress in the Arts.

First edition, inscribed ‘To Geoffrey / my best copy / Wyndham’. Lewis breaks here with abstraction in the arts, naming Michael Ayrton, Francis Bacon, Henry Moore, Ceri Richards and others as ‘the finest group of painters and sculptors which England has ever known’. Ayrton collaborated on many illustrations and dust-jacket designs after Lewis lost his sight.

Read more

PONDERING THE HUMAN MIND AND BODY SPERLING, Johann.

Anthropologia physica Johannis Sperlings Phys. Prof. Publ.

Uncommon first edition of this interesting philosophical and physiological work by the important German zoologist Johann Sperling (1603–1658).

Read more