Sabina Zembra; a Novel ... in three Volumes ...

London: Macmillan and Co ... 1887.

3 vols., 8vo., with half-titles, and terminal advertisement leaves in each volume, original blue cloth, ruled in black, spines gilt, a very good copy.

£180

Approximately:
US $252€202

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First edition. Black was highly thought of by contemporary reviewers, The Athenaeum in 1877 claiming that ‘his genius resembles that of Mr. Trollope, but his taste is better’. Wolff 507.

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[JOHNSON, Samuel].

Rasselas.

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MARIVAUX, Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de.

Le Paysan parvenu: or, the fortunate Peasant. Being Memoirs of the Life of Mr. ––––. Translated from the French … London: Printed for John Brindley … Charles Corbett … and Richard Wellington … 1735.

First edition in English, originally published in French in the Hague in 1734-5. This is the second of the two important novels by Marivaux, which broke new ground in the art of writing fiction. ‘Where La Vie de Marianne belongs to the moralizing and sentimental romance tradition, Le Paysan is a cynical comic novel of the way of the world, though both stories are full of subtle psychological observations. The tale is told in later life by the unashamed and good-humoured hero Jacob, who has risen from his peasant origins to a wealthy and respectable position as a tax-farmer thanks to his resourceful wit and his physical attractions. He profits amorally from the affections of a series of (usually older) women, some of them with reputations for piety; these adventures are recounted in a spirited style, with a sharp eye for the hypocrisy of the respectable’ (New Oxford Companion to Literature in French).

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