Randolph Caldecott: a personal memoir of his early art career.

London, Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, Rivington, 1886.

8vo, pp. xvi, 216; portrait frontispiece, advertisement pages to rear; foxing to the preliminaries and last leaves, front free endpaper with some abrasion following the removal of a leaf previously stuck near gutter, tear to rear endpaper; text block loose, outside of edges gilt, rear endpaper with tear to hinge from top; a good copy in publisher’s green cloth, illustration and gilt lettering to the cover and spine; corners and caps bumped, rubbing to rear board; owners inscription of [J. N.] Keynes to the half-title.

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First edition of a memoir detailing the early artwork of Randolph Caldecott, a 19th century English magazine and newspaper illustrator, known for his work ‘Picture Books’. The book consists of extracts from his letters which aim to act as a setting for his many illustrations, often political, including those from Punch.

Provenance: from the Keynes family library.

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