Sydney Papers, consisting of a journal of the Earl of Leicester, and original letters of Algernon Sydney. Edited, with notes, &c.

London, John Murray, 1825.

8vo, pp. xxxvi, 284; two leaves of facsimile letters after prelims; some light foxing in places, otherwise clean; with presentation inscription from Blencowe on front free endpaper; in nineteenth century half roan, brown cloth boards, leather edged in gilt, spine ruled and lettered in gilt; some marking and light wear.

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Sydney Papers, consisting of a journal of the Earl of Leicester, and original letters of Algernon Sydney. Edited, with notes, &c.

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First edition, a presentation copy, of this collection of documents relating to the life and trial of the seventeenth century political philosopher and republican Algernon Sydney, edited by the antiquarian Robert Willis Blencowe (1791-1874).

The bulk of the volume contains the journal of the Earl of Leicester, Sydney’s father, covering the period from the start of 1647 to 1660, followed by letters between father and son in the period 1660-3, and a set of explanatory notes by Blencowe.
OCLC: 2712973

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