Al’manakh dlia vsekh. Kniga vtoraia [Almanac for all. Second book].

St Petersburg, “Novyi zhurnal dlia vsekh”, 1911.

8vo, pp. 157, [3]; some light spotting; pages opened roughly causing occasional loss to blank margins; a good copy in the original grey-green printed paper wrappers, head and tail of spine repaired.

£200

Approximately:
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Al’manakh dlia vsekh. Kniga vtoraia [Almanac for all. Second book].

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First edition, rare, the second of two annual literary almanacs with this title, with poems by Blok, Gorodetsky and Kuzmin, and short fiction by Chulkov, Gusev, Count Aleksei Nikolaevich Tolstoy and Ivan Poroshin.

Aleksei Tolstoy had published his first substantial book, Povesti i rasskazy, in the previous year. Here, ‘Katen’ka’ is an early adventure story subtitled ‘from the notebook of an officer’; set in the eighteenth century, it looks forward to his famous Peter the First (1929), the most popular historical novel of the Soviet era.

Not found in OCLC.

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