Pirated by Pope

Letters, on the Spirit of Patriotism: on the Idea of a Patriot King: and on the State of Parties, at the Accession of King George the First.

London: Printed for A. Millar … 1749.

8vo, pp. xi, [1], 9-251, [1], with a half-title; first and last few leaves foxed, but a good copy in contemporary polished calf, rebacked preserving the old spine, red morocco labels; ownership inscriptions of James Bunn (contemporary) and Thomas Bunn (later); bookplate of the broadcaster and bibliophile D. G. Bridson, with a few passages marked by him in the margin in pencil.

£375

Approximately:
US $451€417

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Letters, on the Spirit of Patriotism: on the Idea of a Patriot King: and on the State of Parties, at the Accession of King George the First.

Checkout now

First authorised edition. Written in 1738 for the Prince of Wales, the manuscript was then entrusted to Pope who had it printed, to Bolingbroke’s fury: he bought up the entire edition and had it burnt in October 1744 (only two imperfect copies survive, at the British Library and Princeton). He later issued this edition, with a preface reproaching Pope (though he is not named directly) for his ‘breach of trust’.

Bridson would have read this volume as part of his research for The Filibuster: a Study of the political Ideas of Wyndham Lewis (1972), in which he mentions that Lewis ‘admits to having toyed with the idea of a Patriot King as predicated by Bolingbroke’.

Rothschild 414.

You may also be interested in...

MINIATURE HORACE HORACE. 

Opera omnia. 

A scarce miniature edition of Horace’s works, printed by Didot fils with type cut by Henri Didot. 

Read more

STATIUS, Publius Papinius. 

Pub. Papinus [sic] Statius, denuo ac serio emendatus. 

First and only Jansson edition of the works of the first-century Roman poet Statius.  The volume opens with the Silvae, a collection of poems in five books addressed to patrons including the emperor Domitian, containing Statius’s famous lines on the death of a friend’s parrot.  His twelve-book epic hexameter poem the Thebaid follows, relating the quarrel between Oedipus’s sons Eteocles and Polyneices, and the collection ends with the unfinished Achilleid, telling the story of Achilles up to his departure for Troy, including his adventures on Scyros disguised as a girl. 

Read more