Memoirs of Thomas Hollis…

London, Gillet, 1808.

Large 4to, pp. [8], 60; stipple-engraved frontispiece portrait, nine further engraved plates, one folding, illustrating the Hyde at Inglatestone, Essex, its grounds and its antiquities; plates lightly foxed with some inkstains and marks to margins, but a good copy in recent half morocco and marbled boards, spine gilt.

£450

Approximately:
US $610€537

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Memoirs of Thomas Hollis…

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First edition of a privately printed memoir of Thomas Brand of the Hyde, who assumed the name Brand-Hollis on inheriting the Dorset estates (and library and collection of sculpture) of his friend the ‘Republican’ Thomas Hollis, the Whig bibliophile. The author, John Disney, a close friend of Thomas Brand, inherited both estates on Brand’s death and unhesitatingly retired to a life of literary leisure, of which this was an early and grateful product, as was the monument to Brand-Hollis erected by Disney in the chancel of Ingatestone Church, illustrated here.

An interesting feature is the series of letters to Brand-Hollis from John Adams, future President of the United States. Adams and Brand-Hollis became friends after Adams was appointed ambassador to London when peace with England was re-established. He visited the Hyde in the summers of 1786 and 1787. There are also letters from Mrs Adams.

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