SPANISH RHODOMONTADES

Spanish Rhodomontades. As also historical and ocular proofs of a true heroism and a superior bravery, shewn by the Spaniards in their wars with the French, Germans, Dutch, and other nations, whom they almost always worsted and got the better of, except the English, who as constantly beat them. Written in Spanish, French, and other languages... [translated] by Mr Ozell.

London, J. Chrichley (i.e. Critchley), 1741.

8vo., with engraved frontispiece, printed in double columns in Spanish and English, roman and italic letter, advertisement leaf at end; English contemporary dark blue morocco, gilt two-line panels and borders on sides with corner ornaments, rebacked, gilt edges.

£750

Approximately:
US $915€840

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Spanish Rhodomontades. As also historical and ocular proofs of a true heroism and a superior bravery, shewn by the Spaniards in their wars with the French, Germans, Dutch, and other nations, whom they almost always worsted and got the better of, except the English, who as constantly beat them. Written in Spanish, French, and other languages... [translated] by Mr Ozell.

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First edition in English, with the Rhodomontades printed in the original Spanish. This collection of braggadocio boastings, drawn from the dramatic dialogue of Spanish practitioners of the Commedia dell'Arte, was first published in French in 1740.

Not in Palau. NUC records 4 copies (Yale, Newberry Library Chicago, Lehigh University Bethlehem, and Union Library Catalogue of Pennsylvania).

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