Aeromaritime.

Paris, Mont-Louis, Clermont Ferrand, c. 1930.

62 x 99 cm, lithographed poster in full colour, a few short tears at head, repaired with backed on linen, A-.

£1500

Approximately:
US $1968€1677

Make an enquiry

In the 1930s, commercial aviation was in its infancy in Africa. The French colonists decided to pioneer an air service, Aeromaritime, to enhance the existing maritime links between Senegal and the Congo, under the auspices of the Compagnie des Chargeurs Réunis, a shipping company, which subsequently leveraged the existing African commercial infrastructure. Launched on the Dakar to Pointe Noire coastline using amphibious planes such as that featured here, the efficacy of the project was significantly impeded by matters of sheer distance (more than 6000km), climate and rainforests. An interesting souvenir of the French colonial era in Africa.

Albert Brenet (1903-2005) was variously appointed Peintre de la Marine, de l’air and de l’Armée by the French Ministry of Defence. This poster exhibits his characteristic technical accuracy.

You may also be interested in...

[BRUNEL, Antoine de.]

A journey into Spain.

First edition in English. A free and abridged translation of Voyage d’Espagne curieux, historique et politique, first published anonymously in 1665. Setting out from the Netherlands in 1651 in the company of François van Aerssen, Brunel toured France, Germany and Italy before travelling to Spain in March 1655. The party made its way to Madrid via San Sebastián, Vitoria and Burgos, returning to France at the end of June via Zaragoza, Tudela and Pamplona. Aranjuez and Alcalá de Henares are also described. Brunel compiled this account of his travels around 1657 using his own notes and those of Van Aerssen (who drowned on his return to the Netherlands and to whom the work is sometimes attributed).

Read more

CHANDLER’S TRAVELS IN GREECE: ‘THE ACCOUNT OF ATHENS IS VERY IMPORTANT; IT WAS THE MOST DETAILED CHANDLER, Richard.

Travels in Greece: or an Account of a Tour made at the Expense of the Society of Dilettanti.

First edition. The classical scholar, traveller, and author Chandler (bap. 1737, d. 1810) was educated at Winchester College and Queen’s College, Oxford, and awarded a demyship at Magdalen College in 1757. Following the publication of an annotated collection of fragments by Tyrtaeus, Simonides, Theognis, Alcaeus, Sappho, and other Greek poets in 1759, Chandler published a catalogue of the Arundel marbles in 1763 as Marmora Oxoniensis. ‘In 1764 Chandler was introduced to the Society of Dilettanti by Robert Wood, editor of The Ruins of Palmyra, and was commissioned by the society to undertake a tour of exploration in Asia Minor and Greece in the first independent mission funded by the society. As treasurer he was given command of the expedition, and was accompanied by Nicholas Revett [...] and by the watercolour painter William Edmund Pars. They were instructed to make Smyrna their headquarters and thence “to make excursions to the several remains of antiquity in that neighbourhood”; to make exact plans and measurements; to make “accurate drawings of the bas-reliefs and ornaments”; and to copy all inscriptions, all the while keeping “minute diaries”. Having embarked from Gravesend on 9 June 1764 the party spent about a year in Asia Minor [...]. On 20 August 1765 they left Smyrna for Athens, where Chandler gloomily noted that the Parthenon was in danger of being completely destroyed. He bought two fragments of the Parthenon frieze that had been built into houses in the town and was presented with a trunk that had fallen from one of the metopes and lay neglected in a garden. Although the party visited other parts of the Greek mainland their plans to visit Ithaca, Cephallonia, and Corfu were abandoned, principally because of the group's poor health’ (ODNB).

Read more