LAW REFORM

Present state of the law. The speech of Henry Brougham, Esq., M.P., in the House of Commons, on Thursday, February 7, 1828, on his motion, that an humble address be presented to his majesty, praying that he will graciously be pleased to issue a commission for inquiring into the defects occasioned by time and otherwise in the laws of this realm, and into the measures necessary for removing the same.

London, Henry Colburn, 1828.

8vo, pp. xii, 125, [1] blank, [2]; sporadic pencilled marginalia and underlinings throughout; some light foxing and spotting in places; in contemporary half calf, gilt-lettered label on spine; some wear, but still a good copy, with the book-plate of the Whig M.P. George Wilbraham (1779-1852) on front paste-down.

£250

Approximately:
US $338€298

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Present state of the law. The speech of Henry Brougham, Esq., M.P., in the House of Commons, on Thursday, February 7, 1828, on his motion, that an humble address be presented to his majesty, praying that he will graciously be pleased to issue a commission for inquiring into the defects occasioned by time and otherwise in the laws of this realm, and into the measures necessary for removing the same.

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First edition of the famous speech by the future Whig Lord Chancellor Henry Brougham on the necessity of a Royal Commission to investigate the state of the English legal system, which was to set in train the fundamental reforms that were enacted in the second third of the nineteenth century. Lasting six and three-quarter hours (and so still the longest recorded speech in the Commons). Covering the constitution of the courts, the state of litigation, the rules and use of evidence, the organisation of trials, and the execution of sentences, the speech identifies deficiencies throughout the legal system, many of which Brougham sought to address in his four years as Lord Chancellor, from 1830.

OCLC: 834931

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