The North-Country-Wedding, and the Fire, two Poems in blank Verse …

Dublin: Printed by A. Rhames, for J. Hyde, Bookseller … 1722.

4to., pp. 16; portion of fore-edge margin torn away from title-page, else a good copy, disbound, restitched in early wrappers.

£1250

Approximately:
US $1672€1496

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The North-Country-Wedding, and the Fire, two Poems in blank Verse …

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First and only edition, rare, of the only published work by the Fermanagh-born poet and clergyman Nicholas Brown (1699-1734), misattributed by ESTC to his father. Both pieces are burlesques in the manner of Philips’s The Splendid Shilling, but have their own merit, and were reprinted by Matthew Concanen in his Miscellaneous Poems … by several Hands (1724).

After a childhood in England, Brown returned to study at Trinity College Dublin 1716, and his Dublin ‘Garret vile’ is the subject of the second poem, ‘The Fire’ – the narrator, an impoverished poet, vainly attempts to stuff the holes in his roof to stop the cold wind before repairing to sing for his supper in a warmer, friendlier room. ‘The North-Country-Wedding’ takes Brown’s native Fermanagh as its setting, and in generously comic tone, describes the wedding procession and the progress to the matrimonial bed.

ESTC shows five copies only, in four locations: Dublin City Libraries (2 copies), National Library of Ireland; Bodley; and Yale.

Foxon B 506.

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