De Cervo Volante et eius Hybernaculo.

Wolfenbüttel, [for the author], 1739

4to, pp. 12, with 1 engraved plate; a large copy in very good condition and bound in contemporary marbled wrappers.

£475

Approximately:
US $608€540

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De Cervo Volante et eius Hybernaculo.

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First and only edition of the earliest monograph on the stag beetle. The fine plate shows the insect in all its glory, also his winter quarters in the trunk of an oak tree.

Franz Ernst Brueckmann (1697-1753) was a physician at Braunschweig and Wolfenbüttel who was also an avid collector and assembled a fine cabinet containing minerals, fossils, natural history objects, scientific instruments, and curiosities. He travelled widely in the German speaking lands and wrote a number of essays, styled travelling letters (epistola itineraria), on topics he was interested in, some also discussing fellow collectors and their collections. These epistolae were issued separately and privately printed for the author. This is epistola itineraria 78. Brueckmann was a member of the Berlin Academy and the Leopoldian academy at Vienna.

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