Parthenia or the maydenhead of the first musicke that ever was printed for the virginalls.

[London, Chiswick Press for W. Heffer & Sons, Cambridge, 1943.]

Small folio, ff. [17]; tiny stain at foot of first two leaves, but an excellent copy, in brown morocco by Zaehnsdorf, title stamped in gilt on upper cover, top edges gilt, some others untrimmed.

£225

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Parthenia or the maydenhead of the first musicke that ever was printed for the virginalls.

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Facsimile reprint of the original edition of c. 1612/13, handsomely bound by Zaehnsdorf. At the end is a short introduction to the work by the great Austrian musicologist and bibliographer Otto Erich Deutsch.

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