THE FIRST ENGLISH CHURCH AT DINAN

On the occasion of a Bazaar held in aid of Funds required for the Completion of the first English Church at Dinan, which was begun by the Rev. W. Watson, in 1868. .

[Dinan, 1869?]

Small card, 155 x 115 mm (6 x 4½ inches), with an albumen print photograph of the church above two columns of verse, signed E. H. C.

£100

Approximately:
US $137€118

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On the occasion of a Bazaar held in aid of Funds required for the Completion of the first English Church at Dinan, which was begun by the Rev. W. Watson, in 1868. .

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‘A Church Bazaar takes place to-day, / And for all aid we humbly pray / Tho’ many have giv’n with liberal hands, / A heavy debt against us stands ....’ Dinan, in Britanny, was popular with English visitors for health or leisure, according to the poem, and for many years English services had been held in a small room. Now a brave vicar had started to build an English church, but had not lived to see it finished. ‘The work he left so well begun, / We surely must not leave undone!’ The church was finished in 1870.

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