A. Nouveau traité d’arithmètique.

Tournay, Blanquart, 1800.

4to, pp. 143, [1]; with a woodcut vignette to the title; very light toning, one or two minute wormholes at gutter, but a very good copy, in contemporary half roan, marbled paper cover to sides, flat spine filleted in gilt, gilt morocco lettering-piece; stamp to the lower margin of p. 4 (Blanquart).

£1200

Approximately:
US $1574€1342

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First edition, very rare, of a book on arithmetic which concentrates on its applications to trade and accountancy. The book deals with tariffs, tables of exchange, measures, calculation of interest, rent, and chapters on the nature of companies and of bankruptcy.

Not in OCLC. Not found in French or Belgian union catalogues.

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