WITH AN EXTRA LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS, UNRECORDED

Poems on several Occasions … Third Edition, much enlarged.

London: Printed by E. Say, 1729.

4to., pp. [16], 226, [4]; with a mezzotint frontispiece portrait (not present in all copies), a half-page engraving of the arms of the Countess of Burlington, and a subscribers’ list; frontispiece and title-page browned, rather foxed throughout, closed tears to first leaf of index; else a good copy in contemporary half red morcco, worn.

£650

Approximately:
US $912€731

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‘Third edition’, in fact a substantially different work from the two rare (and much less substantial) pamphlet collections of 1713 and 1720. This copy has a single-leaf ‘Additional List of Subscribers’ bound before the main text and not recorded in ESTC.

This is the principal collection of the verse of the leading ‘ballad-maker’ of his age, now best known for his burlesque operas such as The Dragon of Wantley (1737). Among the pieces include here for the first time are ‘Namby-Pamby’, a satire on Ambrose Philips, and the ballad ‘Sally in our Alley’.

The long list of subscribers includes Pope, Handel, Nicola Haym, Anne Oldfield, Colley and Theophilus Cibber, and John-Frederick Lampe. Pope, Handel, and Lampe all have poems addressed or dedicated to them here, as do a number of minor composers and actors.

Foxon, p. 107.

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