Introduction to semantics.

Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press, 1942.

8vo, pp. xii, 236; a very good copy, in the original blue cloth, spine lettered in gilt; spine extremities, edges and corners lightly worn; ownership inscription of R.P. Brady dated 10/10/1945 on front free end-paper; some pencil underlining and marginalia in Brady’s hand. With an autograph letter signed by Carnap laid in, complete with addressed envelope.


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First edition. The letter inserted in this copy, dated February 26th 1947, is one leaf, penned and signed by Carnap, and addressed to R.P. Brady, a graduate student whose idea of a new introduction to Principia Mathematica Carnap finds ‘very interesting’. In response to Brady’s request, Carnap offers a reading list on mathematical logic with brief comments, adding Cramer’s Mathematical methods in statistics as a final suggestion in the field of probability and statistics.

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