A tangle tale ... with six illustrations by Arthur B. Frost.

London, Macmillan and Co., 1885.

8vo, pp. [10], 152, [2], with half-title and frontispiece; occasional light spotting but a good copy in original red cloth with gilt designs to covers, gilt edges; armorial bookplate of Cyril Frampton and inscription to Lionel Frampton from Aunt Bess (1899) to front pastedown.

£200

Approximately:
US $272€224

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A tangle tale ... with six illustrations by Arthur B. Frost.

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First edition. A collection of ten amusing stories, known by Carroll as ‘Knots’, each concealing a mathematical problem, the answers to which are given in the appendix. The charming illustrations are by the American illustrator Arthur Burdett Frost (1851-1928), who also illustrated works by Charles Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, and Mark Twain.

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