Symbolic Logic. Part I. Elementary [all published].

London & New York, Macmillan & Co., 1896.

Small 8vo, pp. xxxi, [1] blank, 188, [1] blank, [3] advertisements; a nice, clean copy in the original publisher’s brown cloth, extremities a trifle rubbed, ‘Common Room’ in manuscript to the front pastedown, ‘presentation copy’ embossed in blind to the title.

£1650

Approximately:
US $2146€1908

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Symbolic Logic. Part I. Elementary [all published].

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First edition. ‘The first part of Symbolic Logic… is a serious attempt to popularize Formal logic and accuracy of thought, largely by the use of diagrams… The novelty of method and fame of the author secured a considerable vogue for this book. Dodgson attached special value to this book, if, as he hoped, it would lead to clearer judgements in people who thought at all’ (Williams et al.).

‘Once master the machinery of Symbolic Logic, and you have a mental occupation always at hand, of absorbing interest, and one that will be of real use to you in any subject you may take up’ (p. xiii).

‘Dodgson was attracted by the contemporary interest in the diagrammatization of the logic of classes, and he had read and appreciated Venn’s seminal contributions. In fact he modified Venn diagrams by making their boundaries linear and by introducing coloured counters that could be moved around to signify class contents – a very simple and effective device’ (DSB).

Church, p. 19 (4th edition); Risse II, 136; Williams, Madan, Green & Crutch 270.

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