Tianshu: Passages in the Making of a Book.

[London], Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 2009.

8vo, pp. iii, [1], 177, with 40 pages of colour illustrations; clear plastic binding.

£45

Approximately:
US $55€49

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Tianshu: Passages in the Making of a Book.

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This is the most comprehensive study on Tianshu to date, focusing on both the bibliographic and technical details of the work. The text contains new essays by Xu Bing (published both in Mandarin and in translation), John Cayley (Brown University), Professor Lydia Liu (Columbia University) and Professor Haun Saussy (Yale University). It also includes an essay from 1994 on Xu Bing's 'nonsense writing' by Professor Wu Hung (University of Chicago), a detailed bibliographic description of the Tianshu and a thorough exhibition history.

ISBN: 0-9550852-9-2.

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