MORGES IMPRINT

De vera peccatorum remissione, adversus humanas satisfactiones et commentitium ecclesiae Romanae purgatorium, theologica et scholastica disputatio. Authore A. Sadeele.

Morges, D. Bern for Jean le Preux (colophon: Genevae, excudebatur a Gabriele Cartier, sumptibus Ioan. et Franc. le Preux), 1582.

8vo., pp. 188, [2], roman letter with woodcut arms on title; new half calf.

£650

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De vera peccatorum remissione, adversus humanas satisfactiones et commentitium ecclesiae Romanae purgatorium, theologica et scholastica disputatio. Authore A. Sadeele.

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First edition, rare. This work, bearing the imprint of the small Swiss town of Morges, is the third of three treatises by Chandieu (1534–1591) which reiterate Calvinist standpoints on key aspects of theology. Concerned with the remission of sins and the existence of Purgatory, it is divided into six chapters, the fourth and largest of which systematically refutes Catholic criticism of Protestant doctrine.

The French Reformed theologian Chandieu ‘took an active part in the deliberations of the first national synod of the Reformed Church in France which was held at Paris May 26–28, 1559, and assisted in preparing a confession of faith … In the religious war of 1585 he was field-chaplain to Henry of Navarre; but in May, 1588, he returned to his family at Geneva, where he died three years later, lamented by the Protestants of Geneva and France and by Beza. Chandieu was a prolific author, writing under the pseudonyms of Zamariel, Theopsaltes, La Croix, and, after 1577, of Sadeel’ (New Schaff-Herzog, III pp. 1–2).

Adams L218. OCLC records two copies only (Berlin and Cambridge).

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