Etchings illustrating Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’. Introduction and Translation by Nevill Coghill.

[London,] Waddington, 1972.

Elephant folio, pp. 189, [3], with a half-title, a terminal limitation leaf, and a title-page vignette and 19 full-page etchings with aquatint by Frink, with tissue-guards; a fine copy, on heavy cotton-rag paper, edges untrimmed, in the original green cloth, cover gilt with a hawk design, slipcase.

£4250

Approximately:
US $5294€4790

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Etchings illustrating Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’. Introduction and Translation by Nevill Coghill.

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First edition of Frink’s monumental Canterbury Tales, one of 50 copies in the standard edition, numbered B 70 and signed by Frink, from an entire print run of 300 copies.

Frink, the pre-eminent British sculptor of her generation, was also a talented print-maker, exploiting the more sculptural possibilities of the etching with technical virtuosity and with a particularly fine eye for negative space. She turned to Chaucer for inspiration several times in her career; the present series, of nineteen large etchings, embraces the changes of theme and register for which Chaucer is famous – from bawdry to chivalric romance. Nevill Coghill’s seductive translation of the text into modern English accompanies the illustrations.

The edition is found in several different forms – 50 ‘A’ copies bound in leather and vellum, 50 ‘B’ copies bound as here in green cloth, 175 ‘C’ copies unbound in portfolios, and 25 hors commerce in portfolios.

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