COMMENTARY, in Latin; a complete paper leaf, double columns of 61 lines, the words commented on written in a large formal gothic script, the extensive commentary written in a small rapid gothic script, brown ink, ruled lightly with plummet, two spaces for decorative initials left blank, in excellent condition. 332 x 201 (261 x 165 mm)

Italy, mid-15th century.

£250

Approximately:
US $345€288

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COMMENTARY, in Latin; a complete paper leaf, double columns of 61 lines, the words commented on written in a large formal gothic script, the extensive commentary written in a small rapid gothic script, brown ink, ruled lightly with plummet, two spaces for decorative initials left blank, in excellent condition. 332 x 201 (261 x 165 mm)

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Much of the commentary is concerned with legal transactions and gives instructions about how to produce a valid legal document, such as putting the name of the reigning emperor at the start of the text. The commentary also discusses the different professions and occupations such as head of state, judge, advocate, soldier/knight, pugilist, archer, slave/servant, wife, farmer, philosopher, and logician; and there is a discussion about the properties of a saphire. Among the sources cited are the Digests of Justinian, Jerome, Isidore, Ambrose, and Lactantius. From the collection of E. H. and E. M. Dring.

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