Memoirs of the private and public Life of William Penn.

London, Richard Taylor & Co. for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, & Brown, 1813.

2 vols in one, 8vo, pp. I: xii, 520, II: [4], 500; minor spotting, old repair to vol. II title, short marginal tears to I, 2A1, and II, B1-2; a very good set, together in recent calf-backed boards with non-pareil marbled sides, spine lettered directly in gilt; minimal rubbing at extremities; contemporary annotations to I, p. 324, early ink stamps partially erased.

£125

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First edition, an early biography of the founder and namesake of Pennsylvania. Penned by the abolitionist Thomas Clarkson (1760-1846), the account records highly favourably the life of the Quaker leader, ‘a Statesman, who acted upon Christian principle in direct opposition to the usual policy of the world’ (p. viii).

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