TURKISH GRAMMAR WITH DIALOGUES AND FABLES

Primi principi della gramatica Turca ad uso dei missionari apostolici di Costantinopoli ...

Rome, stamperia della Sac. Congr. di Prop. Fide, 1794.

4to, pp. 12, 730; title in red and black with woodcut device, text in Roman and Arabic script, tail-pieces; a little light foxing; very good in near contemporary half vellum over marbled boards; some wear to corners and edges, abrasions to boards; small ink stamp to half-title and title.

£1500

Approximately:
US $1821€1774

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Primi principi della gramatica Turca ad uso dei missionari apostolici di Costantinopoli ...

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The first complete Ottoman Turkish grammar published in Italian, compiled by the Catholic Armenian dragoman Cosimo Comidas de Carbognano (translator to Count de Ludolf, minister of the Two Sicilies to the Ottoman Porte in the late eighteenth century) and published by the Sacra Congregatio de Propaganda Fide. This grammar was written for the use of Franciscan missionaries in Istanbul, who sought to convert the Greek, Armenian, and Jewish residents of the city, as imperial edict banned them from proselytising Muslims.

Following the grammar come five charming dialogues presented in three columns (Turkish in Arabic script, Turkish in transliteration, and Italian). These comprise lively conversations between a husband and wife (including an argument over earrings); a father and son (the former advising the latter to be a good Catholic); a student and a teacher (who discuss an armillary sphere); two travelers (who discuss their journeys); and two friends (lamenting that only money is held in esteem). The work ends with Turkish translations of several short Latin fables ‘raccolte da Marquardo Guido’.

Atabey 266.

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