Memorabilia, or, the most remarkable passages and counsels collected out of the several declarations and speeches that have been made by the King, his L. Chancellors and Keepers, and the Speakers of the honourable House of Commons in Parliament since his majesty’s happy restauration, anno, 1660, till the end of the last parliament, 1680. Reduced under four heads; 1. Of the Protestant religion. 2. Of popery. 3. Of liberty and property, &c. 4. Of parliaments ...

London, for Nevil Simmons, Tho. Simmons, and Sam. Lee, 1481 [i.e. 1681].

Folio, pp. [2], 32, ff. 33-36, pp. 33-42, 49-108, [4 addenda]; without frontispiece portrait; some damp staining to lower margins, small loss to blank corner of last leaf, a few marks; else good in recent green cloth, spine lettered gilt.

£250

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Memorabilia, or, the most remarkable passages and counsels collected out of the several declarations and speeches that have been made by the King, his L. Chancellors and Keepers, and the Speakers of the honourable House of Commons in Parliament since his majesty’s happy restauration, anno, 1660, till the end of the last parliament, 1680. Reduced under four heads; 1. Of the Protestant religion. 2. Of popery. 3. Of liberty and property, &c. 4. Of parliaments ...

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First edition, scarce on the market, of this compendium by the legal writer and lawyer Edward Cooke (fl. 1680-1682), written during the hysteria of the Popish Plot and the Exclusion Crisis under Charles II. Cooke joined the polemical battle to exclude the openly Catholic James, duke of York, from the throne in the late 1670s. He concludes his introduction here as follows: ‘if any man should question or suspect his majesties affection towards the Protestant religion, and his firm resolution still to maintain it, together with all our civil rights, let him be pleased to hear him give his own royal word for’t.’

ESTC R6281

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