DEFOE’S CRUSOE

Twenty-Four Sermons preached at the Merchant-Lecture at Pinners Hall …

London: Printed by S. Bridge, for Thomas Parkhurst … 1699.

8vo., pp. [10], 372, [4, ads], with an engraved frontispiece portrait; some browning but a good copy in contemporary speckled calf, spine worn, edges scraped.

£450

Approximately:
US $546€532

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Twenty-Four Sermons preached at the Merchant-Lecture at Pinners Hall …

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First edition, published posthumously, an uncommon collection of sermons by Timothy Cruso, schoolfriend of Defoe, who memorialised his name in Robinson Crusoe.

Cruso (1657-1697), Defoe’s school-fellow at the dissenting academy in Newington Green, became minister to the Presbyterian congregation at Crutched Friars in 1687. He ‘had a reputation well into the eighteenth century as an outstanding and inspirational preacher’ (Oxford DNB), and later filled a vacant lectureship at Pinners Hall after the exclusion of Daniel Williams. He published several separate sermons, but the present collection, edited by Matthew Mead(e) is his best known work.

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