Journal of an officer in the Commissariat Department of the army: comprising a narrative of the campaigns under His Grace the Duke of Wellington, in Portugal, Spain, France, and the Netherlands, in the years 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814, and 1815; and a short account of the army of occupation in France, during the years 1816, 1817, and 1818.

London, Porter and King for the author, 1820.

8vo, pp. xii, 501, [1], [1, errata]; some very occasional light spotting, but a very good copy, untrimmed in the original boards, printed paper spine label; rubbed and slightly stained, some surface cracking along spine, spine label worn and chipped; from the library of Ian Robertson (1928–2020).

£400

Approximately:
US $533€472

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Journal of an officer in the Commissariat Department of the army: comprising a narrative of the campaigns under His Grace the Duke of Wellington, in Portugal, Spain, France, and the Netherlands, in the years 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814, and 1815; and a short account of the army of occupation in France, during the years 1816, 1817, and 1818.

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First edition; rare. Written in the form of a diary, this is a clear and candid account of the Peninsular War as viewed from the Commissary Department of the army. The author sailed from Falmouth on 3 November 1810 in the packet Prince of Wales. During the voyage the ship came under attack from an enemy vessel, but was undamaged and landed at Lisbon on 22 November 1810. From his position ‘behind the lines’ Daniel observed the battles of Fuentes de Oñoro and Albuera, the sieges of Ciudad Rodrigo and Badajoz, and the battles of Salamanca, Vitoria, Nivelle, and Toulouse, besides many other actions. He sailed for England from Bordeaux on 7 August 1814.

‘The much-cursed and criticized Commissariat succeeded in doing its duty, and the length of time for which the British army could keep concentrated was the envy of the French, who, living on the country, were forced to disperse whenever they had exhausted the resources of the particular region in which they were massed. In a way this fact was the key to the whole war’ (Charles Oman, Wellington’s army 1809–1814 p. 162).

Also recounted here are Daniel’s subsequent experiences at the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo.

Alberich 807; Palau 125144.

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