The English in Spain; or, the story of the War of Succession between 1834 and 1840. Compiled from the letters, journals, and reports of Generals W. Wylde, Sir Collingwood Dickson, W. H. Askwith; Colonels Lacy, Colquhoun, Michell, and Major Turner, R.A.; and Colonels Alderson, Du Plat, and Lynn, R.E., Commissioners with Queen Isabella’s armies . . . With illustrations by Lieut.-General W. H. Askwith, R.A.; and map.

London, John Murray, 1877.

8vo, pp. xiv, 346, with an errata slip; with a frontispiece, four plates and a folding map; illustrations in the text; a very good copy in the original pale green cloth, gilt; minor wear, spine very slightly darkened, front free endpapers oxidized; from the library of Ian Robertson (1928–2020).

£400

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The English in Spain; or, the story of the War of Succession between 1834 and 1840. Compiled from the letters, journals, and reports of Generals W. Wylde, Sir Collingwood Dickson, W. H. Askwith; Colonels Lacy, Colquhoun, Michell, and Major Turner, R.A.; and Colonels Alderson, Du Plat, and Lynn, R.E., Commissioners with Queen Isabella’s armies . . . With illustrations by Lieut.-General W. H. Askwith, R.A.; and map.

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First edition. ‘The author in the course of his researches into the history of the Royal Artillery during the years subsequent to 1815 . . . found many interesting letters and journals written by some of the most distinguished of his brother officers, who had been employed under the English Foreign Office as Commissioners with Queen Isabella’s armies during the Civil War in Spain between 1834 and 1840. Although, perhaps, to many English readers this war may not present features of special interest equal to those of the great Peninsular War, yet there must be to the student of history matter for congratulation, when from an impartial source information is obtained about a time during which our countrymen contributed to the pacification and union of a great and – until lately – a divided people’ (preface).

Francis Duncan (1836–1888) was commissioned lieutenant in the Royal Artillery in 1855. ‘In 1871 he was appointed superintendent of regimental records at Woolwich, and this led him to write his two-volume History of the Royal Regiment of Artillery (1872). He wrote several other books . . . . Ambitious, energetic, and hard-working, a keen professional soldier who was never in battle, he was described by an acquaintance as, in the Anglo-Indian phrase, “the sort of man to go tiger-hunting with” ’ (Oxford DNB).

Palau 77288.

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