Art byzantin. Cent planches reproduisant un grand nombre de pièces choisies parmi les plus représentatives des diverses tendances.

Paris, Albert Lévy, [1933].

Large 4to, pp. 79, with 100 plates; a good copy in the original printed wrappers; slightly rubbed, head of spine torn with loss, lower cover detached; from the library of Robert Byron, with his ownership inscription in pencil on front flyleaf and a few pencil markings in the text.

£95

Approximately:
US $122€105

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Art byzantin. Cent planches reproduisant un grand nombre de pièces choisies parmi les plus représentatives des diverses tendances.

Checkout now

First edition. ‘L’exposition qui se tint au Pavillon de Marsan permit d’avoir une vue d’ensemble de l’art byzantin. Pour la première fois, depuis près de cinq cents ans, se trouvèrent rassemblées des pièces de toutes techniques, jusque-là disséminées au hasard des trésors et des collections de l’ancien et du nouveau monde. Celles que reproduisent les planches de cet album figurèrent toutes à l’exposition de 1931’ (introduction).

You may also be interested in...

ROUSE, James and Elizabeth.

Rouse’s Scraps of Sussex. [London] Fulham, drawn and published by James Rouse, drawn and engraved by Elizabeth Rouse, [1817-1825].

An uncommon set of charming topographical aquatint views. James Rouse (1773-1840) worked together with his wife, Elizabeth; on one sheet he calls himself a ‘drawing master’. The views show landscapes but delight more often in capturing rural life, cottages, small villages, churches, ruins, abbeys, roman pavements, etc, and are all populated with figures. There is an early view of the Brighton Pavilion and two views of the Brighton Royal Stables. There are views of the many castle, such as Arundel Castle (several views), Hurstmonceaux Castle, Pevensey Castle, Knap Castle, Hasting Castle (several views), Goring Castle, Bodiam Castle (2), etc.; and there are several country house depicted, such as Findon Place (seat of Mrs. Richardson), Cowdray House (2), Brambletye House, Earl of Ashburnham’s House, and Crowhurst Park.

Read more

MURDER IN THE SERAGLIO BARON, Robert.

Mirza. A Tragedie, really acted in Persia, in the last Age. Illustrated with historicall Annotations.

First edition of Baron’s last literary endeavour, a violent revenge tragedy influenced by Jonson’s Catiline, mostly in verse, packed with political intrigue, murders ‘and Seraglio’s too’, all fitting subjects for its exotic setting. Not intended for performance, which been impossible during the Commonwealth, it was meant instead to be ‘read and carefully digested’ and is, ‘by the standards of its day, an exceptionally long and elaborate play’ (Birchwood, Staging Islam in England).

Read more