SWINISH MULTITUDE

The catechism of man; pointing out from sound principles and acknowledged facts, the rights and duties of every rational being.

London, Carlile, 1818.

[Bound with:]

PORSON, Richard. A new catechism for the use of the swinish multitude. Necessary to be had in all sties … From the Examiner. London, Carlile, [n.d.].

8vo, 2 works bound as one vol.; pp. [2], vi, 3-17, [1 blank]; 8; stains to title-page and gutter of second work, otherwise very good copies in recent brown cloth, spine gilt.

£200

Approximately:
US $258€221

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First Carlile editions of two eighteenth-century pamphlets, the first work first published in 1793 and the second in 1792. Both delivered as dialogues, they are almost antithetical in their style, the first an entirely serious outline of constitutional and despotic governments, the second a savage indictment of all layers of society, through the metaphor of the ‘rotten house’ (parliament) and the ‘black letter sisterhood’ (lawyers) who interpret its writs; the ordinary beleaguered multitude are the lowest hogs, whose rights are to be ‘bled and beaten’.

Richard Carlile (1790-1843) was a radical London publisher, whose practice of reviving revolutionary period pamphlets, including those of Thomas Paine, saw him regularly imprisoned for sedition.

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