The Trial of Daniel Isaac Eaton, for publishing a supposed libel, intituled Politics for the people; or Hog’s Wash: at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, February twenty-fourth, 1794.

London, Daniel Isaac Eaton, [1794].

8vo, pp. 62; occasional spotting and foxing, but largely clean; contemporary ownership signature of Thomas Scolefield in ink on title-page; in twentieth-century red roan-backed cloth, title in gilt on upper cover; new endpapers; slight wear, and small chip to head of spine.

£300

Approximately:
US $411€338

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The Trial of Daniel Isaac Eaton, for publishing a supposed libel, intituled Politics for the people; or Hog’s Wash: at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, February twenty-fourth, 1794.

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First edition. The trial brought Eaton great attention; he was defended by Joseph Gurney and acquitted, adopting thereafter the triumphant imprint ‘Printed by D. I. Eaton at the Cock and Swine’. The case received significant attention in America, where the Alien and Sedition Acts were soon to emerge as tactics to suppress the opposition.

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