Die zehn Gebothe des Herrn, in sittlichen Erzählungen geschildert.

Augsburg, Johann Bapt. Balthasar Merz, 1790.

8vo, pp. [xii], 372; full-page engraved frontispiece depicting a father who reads to his family, engraved vignette to the title, both by Frehling, full-page engraving by J. Weber, two further allegorical vignettes, type ornaments; a few leaves browned, some foxing, heavier to preliminaries; still a good copy in contemporary half calf with marbled paper boards, spine gilt-ruled in compartments, paper lettering-piece, all edges red.

£450

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First edition of Eckhartshausen’s exposition of the Ten Commandments, illustrated by moral stories. Preceded by four short essays - the history of Simon the good Christian, there is no righteousness without religion, the happiness of Mankind is in religion, and Nature proves that there is God, the work goes on to give between three and eleven moral tales per commandment.

Karl von Eckhartshausen (1752-1803) received a broad education in philosophy, law, natural sciences, magic, alchemy, later rising to occupy high office as Censor of the Library at Munich and Keeper of the Archives of the Electoral House.  He was a prolific writer and authored well over a hundred articles on metaphysics, theosophy, religion, fine art, drama, politics, magic, alchemy and the properties of numbers.

No copies traced in the US. Worldcat finds four copies in Germany.

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