Report from the select committee of the House of Commons on petitions relating to the corn laws of this kingdom: together with the minutes of evidence and an appendix of accounts.

London, James Ridgeway, 1814.

8vo in fours, pp. iv, 260, xl; tables in the text and appendix; scattered spotting to the title, occasional blemishes and some pencil side-ruling throughout, else a good copy in contemporary sprinkled calf; spine ruled gilt with gilt morocco lettering piece, spine and extremities slightly chipped, joints rubbed, endpapers marbled.

£300

Approximately:
US $389€332

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Report from the select committee of the House of Commons on petitions relating to the corn laws of this kingdom: together with the minutes of evidence and an appendix of accounts.

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First edition of the sixteen-page Commons report collected together with the minutes of evidence from more than thirty expert witnesses upon whose testimonies the report is founded; quantitative reports of corn and grain exports and imports are appended.

Goldsmiths’ 20929; not in Kress.

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