Gratiarum actio. Wirtembergensibus et Tubingensibus verbi ministris; qui censuris Patriarche Constantinopolitani adversus Confessionem Augustanam scriptis... Additus libellus D. Augustini de ebrietate cavenda iisdem dicatus.

Christopoli [i.e. Poznań, J. Wolrab], 1585.

12mo, pp. [24]; with two woodcut initials and a tail-piece; text printed in italics; very light uniform browning; a very good copy in modern marbled wrappers; contemporary ink addition to the title detailing the content of the second part.

£800

Approximately:
US $1059€936

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Gratiarum actio. Wirtembergensibus et Tubingensibus verbi ministris; qui censuris Patriarche Constantinopolitani adversus Confessionem Augustanam scriptis... Additus libellus D. Augustini de ebrietate cavenda iisdem dicatus.

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Very rare early imprint from Poznań, one of the oldest and most important cities in Poland, a Catholic stronghold. There Johann Wolrab, Nikolaus’ eldest son, founded the second city printing press in 1579. Gratiarum actio had first appeared in 1584 in two productions printed in Krakow and Poznań, both amounting to four pages. All these three imprints are extremely rare. The text of the Gratiarum actio is followed by St. Augustine’s and St Ambrose’s tracts on temperance.

VD 16, E 4123 (‘deutscher Druck?’); IA 165.878.

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