Obsessions and confessions of a book life.

[New Castle], Oak Knoll Press, Books of Kells, Bernard Quaritch, Ltd., 2012.

8vo, (230 x 150 mm), pp. 262, with illustrations to the text; orange cloth, illustrated navy dust-jacket.

£30

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Reminiscences of an author, bookseller, and publisher, written at the age of eighty-eight. Colin Franklin’s newest book wanders freely through themes which have absorbed him—a lost world of publishing, adventures in bookselling, and the irreplaceable scholarly eccentrics who dominated that world a generation ago. Available in USA from Oak Knoll Press; available in Australia from Books of Kells.

ISBN 978-0-9563012-2-2.

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