Bibliotheca Fictiva: a Collection of Books and Manuscripts Relating to Literary Forgery 400 BC – AD 2000.

London, Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 2014.

Large 8vo, (252 x 172 mm), pp. xvi, 424, with colour frontispiece and 36 illustrations in text; burgundy cloth, blocked in gold on spine, printed dust-jacket.

£60

Approximately:
US $77€66

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An inventory of books and manuscripts relating to literary forgery. Spanning some twenty-four centuries, the book seeks also to define and describe the controversial genre it represents. Individual entries offer specific commentary on the forgers and their work, their exposers and their dupes. A broad prefatory overview surveys the entire field in its topical, historical, and national diversity.

ISBN 978-0-9563012-8-4

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