Newton’s Principia, First Book, Sections I., II., III., with notes and illustrations.

London, Macmillan, 1880

8vo, pp. xv, 292, [4 (adverts)], with diagrams in the text; inner hinges beginning to crack; a good copy in the original red cloth, two corners a little bumped, spine faded.

£75

Approximately:
US $104€85

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Second imprint of the third edition. This book, first published in Cambridge in 1854, was intended and used as a text for university students. The author was formerly fellow of St. John’s College.

Wallis 37.03; see Babson for the 1883 edition.

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