Travail, Salaires et Bénéfices … Introduction par C. Bertrand Thompson avec 17 figures et diagrammes hors texte …

Paris, Payot, 1921.

8vo, pp. 214 + [10] advertisements; leaves lightly browned; original publisher’s wrappers.

£80

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First edition in French, translated from the second American edition of Gantt’s Work, Wages and Profits (1916).

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GEORGE, Henry.

A perplexed philosopher, being an Examination of Mr. Herbert Spencer’s various Utterances on the Land Question, with some incidental Reference to his synthetic Philosophy.

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SHIP MONEY AND THE GREAT SEAL PRYNNE, William.

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ESTC: R212529 and R234376; this is the variant noted by OCLC with the B quire signed “F”, designed to be bound with the first work.

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