The present state of Ireland, and the only means of preserving her to the empire, considered in a letter to the Marquis Cornwallis.

London: John Stockdale, 1799.

8vo, pp. [2], [2 (advertisements)], 3-84; aside from occasional light marginal staining, and the odd mark, clean and fresh throughout; in recent paper wrappers.

£200

Approximately:
US $279€231

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The present state of Ireland, and the only means of preserving her to the empire, considered in a letter to the Marquis Cornwallis.

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First edition of this letter on the relationship of Britain and Ireland in the immediate runup to the Act of Union between the two countries. Little is known of the author, a barrister whose name is here misspelled 'Gerahty'; a second letter to Cornwallis, expanding on the present one, also appeared in the same year. Here, he praises Cornwallis for having ‘effected the public safety but without violation of the law, or departure from the duties of humanity’, in the face of a conspiracy unmatched since the days of Catiline.

ESTC T63493; another issue, of pp. [2], 16, 19-50, appeared in the same year (ESTC T18191).

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