POE’S TRANSLATOR

Caleb Williams ou les Choses comme elles sont … Traduction nouvelle par M. Amédée Pichot …

Paris, Paulin, Éditeur … 1847 [-1846].

3 vols. bound in one, 16mo., with a half-title and contents leaf to each volume; a very good copy in contemporary French dark green quarter morocco and brown textured cloth, covers and spine decorated with the coronet of an unidentified French comte.

£550

Approximately:
US $771€619

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First edition of this translation by Amédée Pichot, the Anglophile editor of the Revue britannique (volume I had appeared earlier in Bibliographie de la France (no. 5055, 7 November 1846). Shortly before, Pichot had published the first French translation of any work by Edgar Allen Poe (‘Le Scarabée d’or’ in his Revue, November, 1845), resulting in a conflict with Baudelaire – perhaps to preserve his anonymity as translator Pichot refused Baudelaire access to the Renfield edition of Poe’s works, and turned down the translations he submitted to the Revue.

See W. T. Bandy, ‘Poe’s secret translator: Amédée Pichot’, MLN, 79:3, 1964, 277-80.

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