CONVERSATIONS WITH GOETHE

Razgovory Gete sobrannye Ekkermannom. Perevod s nemetskago D[mitriia] V[asil’evicha] Averkieva. Chast’ pervaia [– vtoraia] [Conversations with Goethe, collected by Eckermann. Translated from the German by D[mitry] V[asilievich] Averkiev. First [– second] part].

St Petersburg, A. S. Suvorin, 1891.

2 vols., 8vo, pp. xix, [1], 358; [2], 416, xxvi; plus twelve pages of advertisements at the end of volume I, and sixteen pages at the end of volume II; slightly browned, titles a little spotted, a couple of short marginal tears, but generally a very good copy in the original light grey-blue publisher’s cloth, blocked in black and lettered gilt (much rubbed away), bevelled edges, some light soiling and abrasion; prize label of Elizaveta Nikolaevna Popova of the Tambovskii Aleksandrinskii Institut for girls, dated 1892.

£1500

Approximately:
US $1829€1772

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Razgovory Gete sobrannye Ekkermannom. Perevod s nemetskago D[mitriia] V[asil’evicha] Averkieva. Chast’ pervaia [– vtoraia] [Conversations with Goethe, collected by Eckermann. Translated from the German by D[mitry] V[asilievich] Averkiev. First [– second] part].

Checkout now

Rare first edition in Russian of Eckermann’s famous Gespräche mit Goethe (1836/48); a second edition followed in 1905.

A professor of English and German at the University of Jena, and later librarian at Weimar, Eckermann was Goethe’s companion and unpaid secretary from 1823 until Goethe’s death in 1832, and he actively assisted in the preparation of the definitive edition of his works, the Ausgabe letzter Hand. He records conversations with Goethe over the last nine years of his life, documenting the poet’s thoughts about drama, poetry, music, painting, philosophy, prominent figures of the day, and much else. Nietzsche famously described the Gespräche mit Goethe as ‘Das beste deutsche Buch, das es gibt’.

Not in OCLC; the Library of Congress has volume II only (volume I supplied from the second edition), and KVK shows a copy at the Anna Amalia Bibliothek, Weimar.

Goedeke IV/2, 503, η (second edition).

You may also be interested in...

‘WIR DEUTSCHEN FÜRCHTEN GOTT UND SONST NICHTS AUF DER WELT!’STRIKING CHROMOLITHOGRAPHIC PLATES DITTRICH, Max, and Max HENZE, artist.

Der Deutsch-Französische Krieg 1870 und 1871. Gedenk-Blätter in Wort und Bild an die Ehrentage der deutschen Nation.

Fortieth edition and 25th anniversary ‘Jubel-Ausgabe’. This lavishly-illustrated account of the Franco-Prussian War was published to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of this conflict that was, in retrospect, a harbinger of the political and military turmoil of the following century: ‘the kingdom of Prussia and her German allies totally destroyed the military power of Imperial France. For nearly eighty years the defeated nation had given the law in military matters to Europe, whereas the victor, ten years earlier, had been the least of the continent’s major military powers. Within a month Prussia established a military pre-eminence and a political hegemony which made the unification of Germany under her leadership a matter of course, and which only an alliance embracing nearly every major power in the world was to wrest from her half a century later’ (M. Howard, The Franco-Prussian War (London: 1961), p. 1).

Read more

HANWAY, Jonas.

An historical account of the British trade over the Caspian Sea, with a journal of travels from London through Russia into Persia, and back again through Russia, Germany and Holland, to which are added, the revolutions of Persia during the present century, with the particular history of the great usurper Nadir Kouli ...

First edition of Hanway’s narrative of his trade mission to Russia, Persia, and the Caspian Sea. Having joined the Russia Company in 1743, Jonas Hanway (1712–1786) sailed for Riga in April that year, before travelling on to St Petersburg, Moscow, and Astrakhan in an attempt to re-establish the fragile trade route to Persia via the Caspian Sea. His mission proved unsuccessful: he was robbed by Khyars and later concluded ‘that the trade held no great promise, for Persia was too poor and Russia was wholly disinclined to see the expansion of Persian power on its southern frontier’ (ODNB). Published after his return to London in 1750, his Account is notable as one of the first European reports of the Caspian region, for its considerable information on the Russian court, where he spent several years, and the German cities visited on his return journey, and for its extensive contemporary history of Persia.

Read more