Briefwechsel zwischen Goethe und Zelter in den Jahren 1796 bis 1832. Herausgegeben von Dr. Friedrich Wilhelm Riemer …

Berlin, Duncker & Humblot, 1833-34.

6 vols., 8vo, with 2 folding tables in vol. IV; closed tear to p. 213 in vol. IV; occasional light offsetting only; a very good set, uniformly bound in contemporary German half calf, flat spines decorated gilt, spine labels lettered gilt; vol. VI worn at head of spine, otherwise light wear only, upper corner of the front flyleaf in vol. V cut away.

£1800

Approximately:
US $2304€2046

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Briefwechsel zwischen Goethe und Zelter in den Jahren 1796 bis 1832. Herausgegeben von Dr. Friedrich Wilhelm Riemer …

Checkout now

First edition, printed on a superior paper to the regular issue, in an attractive and well-preserved contemporary binding.

Goethe was so captivated when he first heard a song by Carl Zelter in 1795 that he wrote his own poem for the music, and it was not long before the two were in touch and collaborating on other projects. It proved a firm and long-lasting friendship: the correspondence extends over 35 years, and Goethe said that he preferred Zelter’s settings of his poems over those of any other composer. Both died, only weeks apart, in 1832.

Goethe chose the editor of the correspondence himself. Friedrich Wilhelm Riemer (1774–1845) had been private tutor to Goethe’s son, August, and helped Eckermann edit the Ausgabe letzter Hand. His indexes here include personal names (i.a. Mendelssohn, Zelter’s star pupil whom, aged 12, he took to meet Goethe in 1821), subjects, and particular pieces of art discussed in the letters.

Provenance: flyleaf of the first volume inscribed by the humanist Coburg teacher Ernst Ludwig Trompheller (1803–1879), indicating that he received this set from four of his pupils as a gift on 14 April 1834. After Trompheller’s death, Ludwig Schemann (1852–1938), member of Wagner’s Bayreuth circle.

Goedeke IV/2, 660, 1491a; Hagen 513; Wilpert/Gühring 159.

You may also be interested in...

[SCHWARZ, Sophie Becker, and Elisa, Gräfin von der RECKE.]

Elisens und Sophiens Gedichte. Herausgegeben von I[ohann] L[udwig] Schwartz.

First and only edition of this anthology of poems by Elisa von der Recke and Sophie Schwarz. It was the first appearance in print of Sophie Schwarz’s poems, published by her husband shortly after her death in 1789 at the age of 35, following the birth of their first child, and was intended as a memorial to her and to her great friendship with Elisa von der Recke. In addition to poems by both women, not originally intended for publication, the book also contains contributions from Gleim, Goeckingk, Tiedge, Anna Luise Karschin and others.

Read more

SUPERBISSIMUM AURIS JUDICIUM RAMEAU, Jean-Philippe.

Nouvelles réflexions de M. Rameau sur sa demonstration du principe de l’harmonie, servant de base à tout l’art musical théorique et pratique.

First edition; rare. ‘This short treatise, which appeared in 1752, is ostensibly a postscript to Rameau’s Démonstration [du principe de l’harmonie], published two years earlier. It nevertheless marks a radical shift in Rameau’s thinking about the corps sonore [Rameau’s term for any vibrating system which emitted harmonic partials above its fundamental frequency]. In that same year, the architect Charles Briseux (c. 1680–1754) published a Traité du beau essential dans les arts in which he used the evidence of Rameau’s discoveries to demonstrate that architecture was based on the principles of harmony. Rameau seized on this corroboration of his theories, which confirmed his growing belief that the principles derived from the corps sonore were “common to all those arts of taste that have our senses for object and proportions for rules”. By now, too, he had discovered the “sensationalist” psychology of John Locke . . . which held that all knowledge is acquired primarily through the senses. Rameau could thus validate the corps sonore by empirical means, in showing that it was “drawn from nature and perceptible to three of our senses” (hearing, sight, touch). This elevation of experience over reason prompted Rameau to adopt as his watchword the aphorism superbissimum auris judicium (“the judgement of the ear is best”), which appears for the first time in these Nouvelles réflexions. He set great store by this publication, sending copies to the Swiss mathematicians Jean II Bernoulli and Leonhard Euler and the Italian philosopher Francesco Maria Zanotti . . . with a request for their opinions of it’ (Graham Sadler, The Rameau compendium, 2014, pp. 141–2).

Read more