Printed price list.

London, c.1840.

Single sheet, 250x140mm, printed on both sides on yellow paper; engraved oval vignette depicting the vaults of the establishment; loss to lower corner, not affecting text, otherwise clean.

£95

Approximately:
US $122€104

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Printed price list.

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An attractive price list for one of our neighbours, the Gray’s Inn Wine Establishment, established by George Henekey in the early nineteenth century. An introduction tells us of the improvents and expansions that had been made to the premises to meet the increase in demand, while giving notice of some of the new additions, in particular the Rota Tent communion wine, which had previously ‘almost fallen into disuse from the substitution of an article of British manufacture’, but was now, thank the Lord, available once more, and supplied to almost all London churches. The price list, divided into wines in wood, wines in bottle, draught wines, French wines, wines of curious and rare quality, spirits of curious and rare quality, and foreign and British spirits, contains some 90 items, and is an unwitting insight into the limits of British trade at the time: the French wine section contains 7 wines, whereas the rest come almost exclusively from Spain, Portugal, and South Africa.

The building, at 23 High Holborn, is now the Cittie of Yorke pub; the cellar room depicted is still in use.

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