Homiliae in Evangelia, book I, homily 2, from the beginning to near the end of verse 2, a single leaf, single columns of 25 lines written in a good romanesque hand in dark brown ink, ruled with a hard point (written space double-lined at inner and outer margins), a few initials set out in margin, space for a larger initial left blank; a few later medieval notes and markings (including a bearded man’s head and a human profile); some light soiling, scuffing and staining, but in very good condition, preserving prickings in outer margin. 266 x 188 mm (202 x 137 mm)

France (perhaps the south), first half of 12th century.

£1750

Approximately:
US $2185€2069

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Homiliae in Evangelia, book I, homily 2, from the beginning to near the end of verse 2, a single leaf, single columns of 25 lines written in a good romanesque hand in dark brown ink, ruled with a hard point (written space double-lined at inner and outer margins), a few initials set out in margin, space for a larger initial left blank; a few later medieval notes and markings (including a bearded man’s head and a human profile); some light soiling, scuffing and staining, but in very good condition, preserving prickings in outer margin. 266 x 188 mm (202 x 137 mm)

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From a well-written manuscript of Gregory the Great’s Homilies on the Gospels, preached most probably during the liturgical year 590–1 and published the following year.

Although written in a different hand, a bifolium now at Columbia University (Plimpton MS 062) appears to be from the same manuscript: the dimensions, number of lines and distinctive ruling scheme are identical. Part of the text of the bifolium has been scrubbed away and a short geometrical treatise written in its place in a fourteenth-century hand, indicating that (as a copy of Gregory’s Homilies) the manuscript had fallen out of use by that time. The Columbia bifolium was once in the collection of George A. Plimpton (1855–1936).

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